Can You Freeze Oatmeal?


Oatmeal is a very versatile breakfast food; you can eat it plain or add fruit to it for a well-balanced breakfast. Oatmeal is typically an easy breakfast to prepare too. You boil some water and add in your oats. 

You can either make your oatmeal from scratch or with instant oatmeal packets that contain dried fruits and other flavors. 

If you don’t like waiting for water to boil in the mornings, is there a faster way to prepare oatmeal? Can you freeze oatmeal ahead of time? 

Can you also freeze oatmeal with fruit and flavoring in it? 

You can make your oatmeal ahead of time and freeze it for later use. You can also freeze oatmeal with some of your favorite fruits in it too. The best way to freeze your oatmeal is by portioning the oatmeal ahead of time. 

You can place your cooked oatmeal with your favorite toppings in a muffin tin. Place the muffin tin in the freezer and allow it to flash freeze. After the oatmeal has been frozen in the tin, you can pop out the portion-sized oatmeal and place them in their own baggies. 

Oatmeal will last in the freezer for up to six months. When you are ready to eat the oatmeal, you can place it in the fridge to thaw the night before. 

To see the most popular oatmeal flavors just click here. 

Can You Freeze Oats? 

If you like to plan ahead and stock your pantry and freezer, it’s best to know what products will last longer in the freezer or can simply stay in your pantry. Since you can freeze oatmeal for up to six months, can you freeze oats too? 

Do oats need to be placed in the freezer or can they stay in your pantry? 

Oats will keep well in the pantry and do not need to be placed in the freezer. When stored properly, it is very rare that oats will go bad. Properly stored oats can last in your pantry for up to two years. If oats do go bad, it is typically due to poor sealing, moisture, or pests. 

How Do You Thaw Oatmeal? 

If you have planned ahead and placed the oatmeal in the freezer, is there a proper way to thaw it? Can you place it on the counter or is it better to keep planning ahead and place it in the fridge the night before? 

To thaw oatmeal, you can just pop it straight into the microwave. You can also thaw your oatmeal in the fridge the night before or leave it out on the counter to thaw, but there is no need since you can just put it straight into a microwave or pot to reheat. 

How Do You Know When Oats/Oatmeal Have Gone Bad? 

Everyone has their favorite flavor of instant oatmeal and their least favorite. If you purchase the variety pack, you are most likely left with flavors that you don’t prefer. If you have a lot of leftover packets, will they eventually go bad? 

If you decide one morning to try one of the packs you’ve been saving throughout the year, is it still edible? Most oats are safe to eat past their expiration date, but how do you know when oats are no longer safe? 

There are four different ways that you can tell your oats have gone bad. \

  1. Mold: The best way to know that your oats have gone bad is by checking for mold. While mold is the easiest option to see if your oats have gone bad, it’s not always the first sign that oats are no longer edible. 
  1. Smell: Another way to know if your oats have gone bad is by smelling them. If they smell like mold but you can’t see the mold, it is best to toss them out. If they smell off in any way, it is best to just throw the oats away. 
  1. Discoloration: If the oats start to look different in color, they are no longer edible. If there is something off with the oats at all, throw them away. 
  1. Bugs: As with most foods, if you see bugs, throw them away. Little gnats and pets can get in your oats and ruin them. 

Oatmeal can follow pretty much the same rule of thumb when determining if it is bad. If it’s moldy or smells funny, throw it out. If the oatmeal has been in the fridge for longer than five days, it probably shouldn’t be eaten. 

Are There Any Benefits To Eating Oatmeal? 

Oats are one of the healthiest grains. They are not only gluten-free but are also a great source of vitamins and minerals. If you enjoy eating a bowl of oatmeal in the morning for breakfast, are you enjoying any health benefits? Does turning oats into oatmeal diminish the health benefits? 

Would it be better to eat eggs or oatmeal to receive health benefits? 

There are several health benefits that you will receive from eating oats. 

  • Oats are a great source of various nutrients: In a bowl of oatmeal, you will receive fiber, protein, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, iron, zinc, vitamin B1, vitamin B6, calcium, and potassium. 
  • Oats are full of antioxidants: Oats have a form of antioxidants called avenanthramides. Avenanthramides can help lower your blood pressure by increasing levels of nitric oxide. This antioxidant is almost only found in oats. 
  • Oats have soluble fiber: The type of soluble fiber found in oats is beta-glucan. Beta-glucan partially dissolves in water and will form as a thick solution in the gut. The benefits of eating beta-glucan fiber are reduced cholesterol, reduced blood sugar, feeling full, and growth of good bacteria in the digestive tract. 
  • Oatmeal can help aid in weight loss: Since the beta-gluten in oatmeal forms as a thick, gel-like substance in your stomach, you will feel fuller for much longer. The more full you feel, the less likely you’ll want to snack between breakfast and dinner. If you eat oatmeal as a snack, it can help prevent you from overeating at dinner since you’ll still be full from your snack. 
  • Oats can be used as skin care products: Finely ground oats can be found in skin care products. Oats are great to use as a treatment for itchy and irritated skin. Oat-based creams are great to use on skin that suffers from eczema. Your skin will only see the benefits from oats when topically applied, not eaten. 

Final Thoughts

If you like to plan ahead and save time, you can start by freezing your morning oatmeal for an easy morning. You can take your frozen oatmeal and pop it in the microwave for a few minutes for a fast, easy, and healthy breakfast. 

Hannah R.

Hey, I'm Hannah and I'm the founder of Get Eatin'.

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